The basis of sharp spike onset in standard biophysical models

by Maria Teleńczuk, Bertrand Fontaine, Romain Brette
Abstract:
In most vertebrate neurons, spikes initiate in the axonal initial segment (AIS). When recorded in the soma, they have a surprisingly sharp onset, as if sodium (Na) channels opened abruptly. The main view stipulates that spikes initiate in a conventional manner at the distal end of the AIS, then progressively sharpen as they backpropagate to the soma. We examined the biophysical models used to substantiate this view, and we found that orthodromic spikes do no initiate through a local axonal current loop that propagates along the axon, but through a global current loop encompassing the AIS and soma, which forms an electrical dipole. Therefore, the phenomenon is not adequately modeled as the backpropagation of an electrical wave along the axon, since the wavelength would be as large as the entire system. Instead, in these models, we found that spike initiation rather follows the critical resistive coupling model proposed recently, where the Na current entering the AIS is matched by the axial resistive current flowing to the soma. Besides demonstrating it by examining the balance of currents at spike initiation, we show that the observed increase in spike sharpness along the axon is artifactual and disappears when an appropriate measure of rapidness is used; instead, somatic onset rapidness can be predicted from spike shape at initiation site. Finally, we reproduce the phenomenon in a two-compartment model, showing that it does not rely on propagation. In these models, the sharp onset of somatic spikes is therefore not an artifact of observing spikes at the incorrect location, but rather the signature that spikes are initiated through a global soma-AIS current loop forming an electrical dipole.
Reference:
Maria Teleńczuk, Bertrand Fontaine, Romain Brette, 2016. The basis of sharp spike onset in standard biophysical models, bioRxiv, Cold Spring Harbor Labs Journals.
Bibtex Entry:
@article {Telenczuk2016,
	author = {Tele{'n}czuk, Maria and Fontaine, Bertrand and Brette, Romain},
	title = {The basis of sharp spike onset in standard biophysical models},
	year = {2016},
	doi = {10.1101/037549},
	publisher = {Cold Spring Harbor Labs Journals},
	abstract = {In most vertebrate neurons, spikes initiate in the axonal initial segment (AIS). When recorded in the soma, they have a surprisingly sharp onset, as if sodium (Na) channels opened abruptly. The main view stipulates that spikes initiate in a conventional manner at the distal end of the AIS, then progressively sharpen as they backpropagate to the soma. We examined the biophysical models used to substantiate this view, and we found that orthodromic spikes do no initiate through a local axonal current loop that propagates along the axon, but through a global current loop encompassing the AIS and soma, which forms an electrical dipole. Therefore, the phenomenon is not adequately modeled as the backpropagation of an electrical wave along the axon, since the wavelength would be as large as the entire system. Instead, in these models, we found that spike initiation rather follows the critical resistive coupling model proposed recently, where the Na current entering the AIS is matched by the axial resistive current flowing to the soma. Besides demonstrating it by examining the balance of currents at spike initiation, we show that the observed increase in spike sharpness along the axon is artifactual and disappears when an appropriate measure of rapidness is used; instead, somatic onset rapidness can be predicted from spike shape at initiation site. Finally, we reproduce the phenomenon in a two-compartment model, showing that it does not rely on propagation. In these models, the sharp onset of somatic spikes is therefore not an artifact of observing spikes at the incorrect location, but rather the signature that spikes are initiated through a global soma-AIS current loop forming an electrical dipole.},
	url = {http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/04/14/037549.full.pdf},
	journal = {bioRxiv}
}